Disabled shoppers back business in statues row

August 25, 2017

A local authority performed a double-quick u-turn after a row erupted about statues outside a shop in the centre of a northern city.

The shop, which sells exotic clothing and jewellery, was well known in the local area for the statues of a Buddha and an African tribal man, both of which are foxed to the frontage and have been there for about 25 years.

But problems arose when two Council officers called at the shop and said the statues had to be removed because they were a trip hazard.

The owner objected and said he was more used to complaints about the pieces, and he was supported by many members of the public, including disabled shoppers.

Responses included observations that the statues were at the side of the footpath and did not cause an obstruction, unlike many new benches “dotted around the town in stupid patterns.”

A wheelchair-used said there was plenty of space to get past the statues, and that most people knew they were there. Another respondent said the next step might be to remove all bins, lamp posts and other street furniture and even ban people from standing still for too long!

The Council back-tracked and said it would make an exception for the store given that the statues have been in place for so long, but they added they will still enforce their “Street Charter” where obstacles are considered to be presenting difficulties for disabled people.